“In prior eras, African-American women’s relegation to agricultural and domestic work more uniformly structured Black women’s oppression as ‘mules uh de world.’ At the turn of the twenty-first century, work still matters, but is organized via social class formations that often place working-class and middle-class women in new, uncharted territories. Black women’s ability to cooperate across class lines for collective empowerment is not new, but the ways in which those class lines have been redrawn within a global political economy is.” (p. 66) Patricia Hill-Collins, Black Feminist Thought

“In prior eras, African-American women’s relegation to agricultural and domestic work more uniformly structured Black women’s oppression as ‘mules uh de world.’ At the turn of the twenty-first century, work still matters, but is organized via social class formations that often place working-class and middle-class women in new, uncharted territories. Black women’s ability to cooperate across class lines for collective empowerment is not new, but the ways in which those class lines have been redrawn within a global political economy is.” (p. 66)
Patricia Hill-Collins, Black Feminist Thought